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5 African American Art Exhibitions You Shouldn’t Miss

As part of our article series on Black History Month, we compiled five Black British art exhibitions you shouldn’t miss in October and beyond. 

Here’s our list curated for art lovers:

British Art Show 9, Plymouth

British Art Show 9 explores three overarching themes: healing, care, and reparative history: imagining new futures, and coming up with tactics for togetherness.

In truth, the art show is composed of four exhibitions adapted to local contexts.

Reparative history refers to the process where the perpetrators of injustices and human rights violations make amends to individuals and populations victimized by their actions.

In Plymouth, the exhibition will be centered on the migration of bodies, peoples, plants, objects, ideas, and forms. 

Plymouth was chosen because the city played a central role in Britain’s colonial conquests when the Mayflower set sail for the “New World” (a Euro-centric and European-coined term) in 1620.

The exhibitions will take place from 8 October through 23 December 2022.

Find out more about the exhibition here.

Attention, Absorption – Nottingham

Maybelle Peters’ most comprehensive exhibition of work in the UK will lead on from the “When We Worked at Raleigh (WWWAR) project and oral archive between 2020 and 2021, delivered in partnership with Nottingham Black Archive.

These media works include a short 16 mm film, an installation of CGI animation, objects, and sound, taking an interdisciplinary approach to consider the effects of environmental and workplace toxicity intersection with the resilience of the Black Caribbean labor force working within British industries. 

The exhibition will take place in Nottingham from Thursday, 15th September, through Friday, 25th November.

Contact admin@weareprimary.org with any access inquiries.

BLACK: The Graphic Novel – Southampton

 

BLACK is the autobiographical story of Tobias Taitt, a child raised in social care from the 1970s to 1980s in Britain. 

Taitt discovered life outside of social welfare and stumbled into the world of crime while also developing an interest in literature.

The graphic novel was illustrated by Anthony Smith, describing in brutal honesty themes of class and race.

The exhibition will feature pages from the novel and some original drawings, with some of the artwork made into billboards across Southampton: Shirley High Street.

The book can be purchased at John Hansard Gallery and October Books.

The event will run from Wednesday, 28th September, through Saturday, 5th November, at 142-144 Above Bar Street Southampton SO14 7DU, from 11 am to 5 pm, with free entry. 

City of London: Slave Trade Money Trail Tour – London

Join Black Rooted through a historical journey of how London came to assimilate the cognitive dissonance that led to the oppression of Black men, women, and children.

This is City of London: Slave Trade Money Trail Tour, which will take its audience through the historical landmarks in London, keeping the memory of its glorification of African enslaved people.

It’ll take place at the Royal Exchange, London, with tickets available here for  £0 – £22.15

S.M.I.L.E-ing boys Experience – London

The S.M.I.L.E-ing boys Experience is a research-led, well-being project led by artist Kay Rufai, challenging the negative stereotypes associated with Black boys.

The S.M.I.L.E-ing boys Experience will take place from Thursday 13th, through Sunday 30th of October. 

Tickets are free.

Learn more about the initiative here.

 

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